Posts Tagged ‘kids’

The Great Sunflower Project – free seeds!

March 4, 2009

Do you have a sunny space where you can plant a few sunflowers?

They are tall but not too wide and can even be planted in large pots on your deck. All they need is full sun and  water.

Lemon Queen Sunflowers

Do you have 30 minutes twice a month look for bees on your sunflowers?

The “project” is all about pollinators…bees. As you may have heard, bee populations worldwide are declining.  This is an effort to track urban bee populations and determine areas where bee numbers are critically low. You can help and get free seeds in the process.

“One of our main goals is figuring out where bees are in trouble.”

Sign up by March 9, 2009

Go to the Great Sunflower Project website and sign up for your free seeds.

Four Easy Steps

  1. Sign up and plant sunflowers.
  2. Describe your garden
  3. Record time it takes 5 bees to visit sunflower (up to 30 min)
  4. Enter data online or mail it in
Bees on last years pumpkin flower

Bees on last year's pumpkin flower

Kids harvest back yard fruit and deliver to seniors in same neighborhood

July 30, 2008

The group is called PUEBLO (People United for a Better Life in Oakland), and they have come up with a brilliant idea. A two-year old program called Urban Youth Harvest brings together kids, produce, and seniors. Produce that would otherwise go to waste is given to those in need. The kids get paid and the seniors get nutritious food delivered to their door free of charge.

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Partnering with Cyclists for Change, our harvesters will bike to our donors’ back yards and, using fruit pickers, will harvest oranges, apples, plums, lemons, grapefruits, peaches, pears, figs and other locally grown delicious and nutritious fruits. They will then deliver the harvest to nearby low-income senior residences and day facilities where low-income seniors receive a variety of services. They will be provided with diabetic recipes that call for those fruits,as well as the fruit, fresh off the vine or tree! – Urban Youth Harvest

This is how you think outside the raised bed! I love this idea.

What if we could all maximize the output of produce in our gardens and give to organizations like this?

In the case of the Urban Youth Harvest they come to you. They will leave a percentage for the homeowner’s use. Show this site to your kids & neighbors. Talk about this with your gardening friends. Perhaps you or someone in your community would be interested in starting a program like this. I am going to see if there is a need for such a program in our area.

Make your own plant tags – 5 easy steps

July 13, 2008

Here’s a fun and easy project for your vegetable garden and you can recycle at the same time.

Calvin and Trevor show you how…

STEP BY STEP INSTRUCTIONS

What you need:

  • Scissors
  • Aluminum can
  • Wire
  • Wire cutters/pliers
  • Permanent marker

Step One: Cut the can into strips

Step Two: Bend the ends of each strip toward the logo

Step Three: Cut and Bend the wire

Step Four: Bend label onto wire stand

Step Five: Label the tag

Place tag in the garden. They also work well in pots when transplanting or rooting cuttings.

Have fun and please share your garden tips and projects with us.

3 Steps to the Perfect Vegetable Garden (Part Two)

May 23, 2008

Step Two: RAISED BEDS

Raised Beds

This one tip can make your garden grow lush, with better seed germination, fewer weeds, and higher vegetable/flower production. Soil prep is also greatly reduced, saving you a ton of prep time and effort each Spring.

Why it works:

  1. You never compact the garden soil by walking on it.
  2. Rototilling is eliminated.
  3. Weeds come out effortlessly.
  4. Vegetable roots spread quickly in the loose garden soil.
  5. Plants grow and fill out rapidly.
  6. Gardening is compartmentalized.

For years I planted our vegetable garden in rows in the existing clay soil. I did amend our soil each year but it became compacted as I walked between the rows to pull weeds, water plants, or harvest. Winter rains further compacted the soil. In the early Spring I’d pull out the rototiller and go to work. I don’t know about you, but in the spring I want to plant, not rototill. I typically avoided the tilling until late in the season. Some years, the Bermuda grass and weeds took over and we never got around to planting a garden at all.

Then I decided to bite the bullet and build a few raised beds and fill them with garden mix. I used old lumber I had collected over the years from past projects or tear-downs. The boxes don’t have to be pretty, just functional. You don’t even need nails. Some of our boxes are made up of a few 4x4s laid on the ground with a couple stakes hammered into the ground to hold them in place.

Raised Bed

Craigslist is a great place to find free lumber and keep it out of the landfill.

I used 2×6 and 4×6 boards for other boxes…whatever I had on hand. I recommend that you fill the bed with at least six inches of good planting mix or garden mix. Most vegetables will root into the top 6″ of soil. The underlying soil will help retain moisture and give aggressive roots a place to go. If your lumber is only 4″ high, dig out 2 inches of existing soil before filling the boxes.

Add planting mix

You can buy planting mix bags at your local nursery or home supply store. If you have a truck, call landscape supply yards and see if they have a “garden mix”. You can save a lot of money if you buy the soil mix in bulk. They will deliver large loads. If you go this route, you may need to add compost to the bulk mix. In my experience, the bulk mixes don’t contain quite enough organic material. The loamy soils are nice but can form a “crust” on top and hinder water penetration. I’ve remedied this by mixing compost into the top layer or adding a product like Soil Moist when planting. Check the soil quality before you buy. The mixture will vary between landscape supply companies. If you want more organic material in the mix, see if they will mix more compost into it for you before they load it into your truck.

Strawberry Patch

You can make boxes in any size but, ideally, you should be able to reach the veggies without stepping inside the box. This keeps everyone from walking on the soil. A good size to start with is four feet by four feet.

TIP: If you have to go with larger boxes (like I did above), add stepping stones or planks to avoid soil compaction. I put three stones in the (far) pumpkin patch above.

In the winter, cover the unused boxes with a 2″ layer of leaves or straw to keep weeds in check. I leave the mulch in place until I am ready to ready to plant each box. If you only get one box planted, no problem. The weeds don’t get out of control in the other beds and they are still waiting for you when you are ready.

Rototilling is not needed. Just add a layer of compost on top of the garden soil in the Spring. Mix it in with your favorite hand tool. A hula hoe works well too.

Garden Tools

Start small and test it out. Build a 3 or 4 foot square and see how it goes. I’d love to hear how this works for you.

It’s time to Plant the garden

May 20, 2008

Look at that squash! (2007)

Well here we go. I’ve been thinking about blogging for awhile now and the garden seems like the perfect place to start. This is Chris (Dad). I’ll be the primary voice here for awhile. Hopefully, one of the kids will chime in from time to time. Mom isn’t much into gardening, but she bears with the tracked-in dirt and the “compost bucket” under the sink.

We’ve had a lot of fun out there over the years. Our garden has seen its share of success and failure, and we’ve learned from it all.

We’ll share with you what works for us and what doesn’t as we plant our garden this year. We will include reviews on our favorite products (like VF-11, and Ladybug Land), gardening tips (like composting and square foot gardening), and share our struggles & successes. Last year’s challenge was pumpkins that never matured. This year we have what looks like verticillium wilt attacking a patch of pansies.

The bottom line is that it’s an adventure out there. If you haven’t started your garden this year, take a day this weekend and spend it in the garden. If the task seems too daunting, start small…very small. Clear enough space for one tomato plant and a few marigolds. If you don’t like tomatoes, how about bush beans?

THIS WEEKEND:

Buy a container and some good potting soil and start there. I’d suggest a depth of twelve inches or more on the container so that it retains moisture. Short boxes dry out too quickly and the plants will suffer if they dry out. Promise yourself that you’ll plant at least one veggie and one flower this weekend. And if you have kids, get them involved!